java vulnerabilities

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Runtime Application Self Protection Securing Java from the Inside Out

Published By: Waratek     Published Date: Mar 23, 2015
Waratek has developed a disruptive new approach to application security that protects applications and sensitive data from attacks like SQL Injection, zero-day and unpatched vulnerability exploits at runtime, without code changes or hardware devices.
Tags : 
application security, runtime application self protection, web application security, sql injection, zero day attack, zero day vulnerability, legacy java code, virtual patching
    
Waratek

Stopping Backdoor Trojans - Japan

Published By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : 
backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
    
McAfee

Taking the Sting Out of Java Vulnerabilities

Published By: Lumension     Published Date: Feb 07, 2014
Java vulnerabilities have dominated the security headlines. Some observers now say organizations should simply turn off the ubiquitous software platform. But what if there were a better way?
Tags : 
lumension, java vulnerabilities, unpatched vulnerabilities, blacklist order, third-party software, endpoint devices, data-security solutions, web content
    
Lumension

Java Insecurity: How to Deal with the Constant Vulnerabilities

Published By: Lumension     Published Date: Oct 20, 2014
"Just over a decade ago, the outcry over Microsoftís security problems reached such a deafening level that it finally got the attention of Bill Gates, who wrote the famous Trustworthy Computing memo. Today, many would say that Microsoft leads the industry in security and vulnerability handling. Now, itís Java thatís causing the uproar. But has Oracle learned anything from Microsoft in handling these seemingly ceaseless problems? In this webinar, Randy Franklin Smith from Ultimate Windows Security will start by reviewing the wide-ranging Java security changes Oracle is promising to make. They sound so much like the improvements Microsoft made back with Trustworthy Computing that Iím amazed it hasnít been done before! Weíll move on to discuss what you can do now to address Java security in your environment. One of the banes of security with Java is the presence of multiple versions of Java, often on the same computer. Sometimes you really need multiple versions of Java to support appli
Tags : 
java, insecurity, vulverabilities, computing, security
    
Lumension

Taking the Sting Out of Java Vulnerabilities

Published By: Lumension     Published Date: Aug 25, 2014
Java vulnerabilities have dominated the security headlines. Some observers now say organizations should simply turn off the ubiquitous software platform. But what if there were a better way?
Tags : 
java, software, security, platform, vulnerability
    
Lumension

Dig Your Own Hole - 12 Ways to Go Wrong With Java Security

Published By: HP - Enterprise     Published Date: Nov 19, 2008
This webinar explores 12 of the most common security traps in Java by examining the causes of security failures in modern Java–based applications. Approaching security with an “outside in” style, we look at vulnerabilities from a developer’s perspective, focusing on the source code.
Tags : 
security, application security, java, vulnerabilities, developer, source code, analysis, fortify software
    
HP - Enterprise

The Top 10 Software Security Vulnerabilities

Published By: HP - Enterprise     Published Date: Nov 19, 2008
Matt Rose, Senior Software Security Consultant at Fortify Software, shares his findings from a year analyzing millions of lines of code. He unveils his top ten most common vulnerabilities and provides detailed examples of each. These technical examples come from his experience working with fortune 500 companies, government agencies, and major ISVs.
Tags : 
security, application security, java, vulnerabilities, developer, source code, analysis, fortify software
    
HP - Enterprise

Stopping Backdoor Trojans - French

Published By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : 
backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
    
McAfee

Stopping Backdoor Trojans - German

Published By: McAfee     Published Date: Mar 31, 2017
The Adwind Remote Administration Tool is a backdoor Trojan written in Java language that targets various platforms that support Java files. Adwind does not exploit any vulnerabilities. In most cases, for an infection to succeed, the user must run the malware by double-clicking the .jar file that is usually distributed as an attachment, or opening an infected Microsoft Word document. The infection spreads if the Java Runtime Environment is installed on the user's computer. After the malicious .jar file is executed on the target system, the malware installs silently and connects to a remote server via a preconfigured port to receive commands from a remote attacker and perform other illegal operations.
Tags : 
backdoor trojans, trojan protection, malware, malware protection
    
McAfee
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